Iran: Tricontinental Nexus for Y-Chromosome Driven Migration

Iran: Tricontinental Nexus for Y-Chromosome Driven Migration

Due to its pivotal geographic position, present day Iran likely served as a gateway of reciprocal human movements. However, the extent to which the deserts within the Iranian plateau and the mountain ranges surrounding Persia inhibited gene flow via this corridor remains uncertain. In order to assess the magnitude of this region’s role as a nexus for Africa, Asia and Europe in human migrations, high-resolution Y-chromosome analyses were performed on 150 Iranian males. Haplogroup data were subsequently compared to regional populations characterized at similar phylogenetic levels. The Iranians display considerable haplogroup diversity consistent with patterns observed in populations of the Middle East overall, reinforcing the notion of Persia as a venue for human disseminations. Admixture analyses of geographically targeted, regional populations along the latitudinal corridor spanning from Anatolia to the Indus Valley demonstrated contributions to Persia from both the east and west. However, significant differences were uncovered upon stratification of the gene donors, including higher proportions from central east and southeast Turkey as compared to Pakistan. In addition to the modulating effects of geographic obstacles, culturally mediated amalgamations consistent with the diverse spectrum of a variety of historical empires may account for the distribution of haplogroups and lineages observed. Our study of high-resolution Y-chromosome genotyping allowed for an in-depth analysis unattained in previous studies of the area, revealing important migratory and demographic events that shaped the contemporary genetic landscape.

irany

I’ve livened it up with a bit of red to show the Kebaran/Natufian PN2 variants, which are conspicuously absent from North Iran. Still no source for p25…I need data from Arabia.

3 responses to “Iran: Tricontinental Nexus for Y-Chromosome Driven Migration

  1. I’ve livened it up with a bit of red to show the Kebaran/Natufian PN2 variants, which are conspicuously absent from North Iran.

    All E1b1 (PN2) Natufian?! I cannot agree with that by any means. It includes the main Y-DNA lineages of Africa (E1b1a and E1b1b). This huge haplogroup probably formed c. 40-30,000 years ago, IMO, splitting at the end of this timeframe in E1b1a (to south, SW), E1b1b1a and E1b1b1b and E1b1bc in rapid sequence. Only E1b1b1b (M78) is somewhat related to West Asia and SE Europe of all these subclades.

    Even if you don’t agree with my age estimates, claiming nearly all E to be Natufian or West Asian in any form is too far fetched. E1b1b formed in Tropical Africa for sure, probably not far from the middle/upper Nile (Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda).

    • All E1b1 (PN2) Natufian?! I cannot agree with that by any means. It includes the main Y-DNA lineages of Africa (E1b1a and E1b1b). This huge haplogroup probably formed c. 40-30,000 years ago, IMO, splitting at the end of this timeframe in E1b1a (to south, SW), E1b1b1a and E1b1b1b and E1b1bc in rapid sequence. Only E1b1b1b (M78) is somewhat related to West Asia and SE Europe of all these subclades.

      Even if you don’t agree with my age estimates, claiming nearly all E to be Natufian or West Asian in any form is too far fetched. E1b1b formed in Tropical Africa for sure, probably not far from the middle/upper Nile (Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda).

      Brought into the near East by the kebaran movement from Africa.

  2. But what I say is that most E-PN2 you marked in red in that graph is not even West Asian (except for the odd erratic). Only E-M78 is (partly).

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